From infancy to childhood: the intersection of gastrointestinal microbial communities, diet and health

JPI HDHL “Intestinal Microbiomics” (IM2015)
From infancy to childhood: the intersection of gastrointestinal microbial communities, diet and health
GI-MDH
2016-05-31
2020-05-31
Eileen K Hutton
McMaster University
Canada

Consortium

Partner Organization Partner Country
Charité Medical UniversityGermany
Maastricht UniversityThe Netherlands

1. Overall project description


1.1 Summary

The human gut microbiota is a complex ecosystem consisting of hundreds to thousands of distinct bacterial species which provide important immune, metabolic and trophic functions for their host. Our knowledge on the processes contributing to microbial dysbiosis has a direct impact on our ability to manage and maintain human health. Early childhood appears a crucial age-window since diversification and maturation of the microbiota primarily occurs during this period under the influence of host development and dietary changes. Early life dietary exposures may dominate over factors such as host genetics in modifying the type and distribution of gut organisms and contribute to disturbances in the gut microbiome, leading to impairment in allergen tolerance, abnormal fat accretion, chronic obesity and metabolic derangement. Previous research has linked weaning and the introduction to solid foods to the transition of an infant to adult microbiota, however, longitudinal studies directly linking cessation of breast-milk or timing of introduction of solid foods with the composition of the microbiome or associations with obesity or allergy were largely lacking. Our project aimed to identify the impact of early life dietary events among infants born at term and preterm on gut microbiome community structures and the subsequent association with health outcomes.


To address this aim we prospectively collected data from ~1000 newborns in Canada, the Netherlands and Germany with multiple biological sampling points to enable longitudinal characterization of microbial communities using 16S rRNA gene profiling of all faecal samples and metagenomic and metabolomic studies on a subset of infants.


Thus far we have found that during the first year of life the development of the microbiome is characterised by an increasing diversity and a shift from a high abundance in bifidobacteria and facultative anaerobes towards butyrate-producing genera within the order of Clostrida. Birth mode was a major driver of microbiota community structure in the first month of life, while thereafter diet became the strongest driving force of microbiota composition. Cessation of breastfeeding had a more pronounced impact on the microbiota maturation than the introduction of solid foods. We are currently working on describing the changes that occur in the infant gut microbiome during the introduction of solid foods and the factors that appear to drive changes in diversity and composition.


1.2 Highlights

- In a longitudinal study of fecal microbiota among children with a genetic predisposition for atopy, from 5 weeks through 6 to 11 years, we tracked changes in gut microbial diversity and composition that were associated with the development of atopic dermatitis, allergic sensitization, and asthma. Members of the Lachnospiraceae family, as well as the genera Faecalibacterium and Dialister, were associated with a reduced risk of atopy.


- Capitalizing on a policy change, we compared preterms given probiotic supplements as part of routine care to those who received none. Our study showed that probiotic bacteria given to preterm infants while they are hospitalized may still be present in their stool for many weeks after supplementation was stopped. Infants that were administered the probiotic had a gut microbial community that was more like healthy 10-day-old full-term infants, suggesting that the probiotic is helping to promote better gut colonization overall.


- Microbiome development throughout the first year of life is characterised by an increasing diversity and a shift from a high abundance in, amongst others, bifidobacteria and facultative anaerobes towards butyrate-producing genera within the order of Clostrida (e.g. Faecalibacterium and Blautia) (all cohorts).


- Despite similar trends in microbiota maturation and harmonisation of all steps from metagenomic DNA isolation to bioinformatic analyses, the microbiota composition significantly differed between cohorts from different geographic regions (all cohorts).


- Birth mode appeared to be a major driver of microbiota community structure in the first month of life, while thereafter diet became the strongest driving force of microbiota composition (PAPS, LucKi). Cessation of breastfeeding had a more pronounced impact on the microbiota maturation than the introduction of solid foods (Lucki, PAPS).


4. Impact


4.1 List of publications

AuthorsTitleYear, Issue, PPDoiPdf
G Galazzo, N van Best, L Bervoets, IO Dapaah, PH Savelkoul, MW Hornef, GI-MDH Consortium, S Lau, E Hamelmann, J PendersDevelopment of the Microbiota and Associations with Birth Mode, Diet, and Atopic Disorders in a Longitudinal Analysis of Stool Samples, Collected From Infancy Through Early Childhood2020 May;158(6):1584-159610.1053/j.gastro.2020.01.024
Renz H, Adkins BD, Bartfeld S, Blumberg RS, Farber DL, Garssen J, Ghazal P, Hackam DJ, Marsland BJ, McCoy KD, Penders J, Prinz I, Verhasselt V, von Mutius E, Weiser JN, Wesemann DR, Hornef MWThe neonatal window of opportunity-early priming for life2018 Apr;141(4):1212-121410.1016/j.jaci.2017.11.019

4.2 Presentation of the project

Target groupAuthorsMeans of communicationHyperlinkPdf
Health care providersE Hutton, J Stearns. “The microbiome: a new frontier”, Association of Ontario Midwives Research Symposium, Hamilton, Canada, 2017Keynote address
Health care providersE Hutton. “The Baby and Mi Project: progress to date”, Hamilton Area Midwives Rounds, Hamilton, Canada, 2017Oral presentationDownload
ScientistsJ Stearns, K Morrison, A Holloway, M Surette, L Thabane, H McDonald, A Mousseau, J Schertzer, E Ratcliffe, J Simioni, E Gunn, E Hutton. “The development of the gut microbiome after exposure to Intrapartum antibiotics (IPA):The Baby &Mi prospective cohort Study”, Canadian National Perinatal Research Meeting 2016, Banff, Canada, 2016Poster presentationDownload
ScientistsK Morrison, E Hutton, H McDonald, A Holloway, J Schertzer, M Surette, L Thabane, A Mousseau, J Stearns, J Simioni, E Gunn “The Baby & Microbiota of the Intestine Project”, Innovation Fund Showcase 2016, Toronto, Canada, 2016Poster presentationDownload
Scientists, studentsK Morrison. Inaugural DOHaD@MAC Research Day, Hamilton, Canada, 2016Invited oral presentation
AcademiaJ Penders. “Establishment of the microbiome in early infancy”. The neonatal window of opportunity, early priming for life congress, Hanover, Germany, 2016. Invited oral presentationLink
Academia and (Food & Pharma) IndustryJ Penders. “Establishing a causal link between gut microbes and body weight – towards the identification of key players”. Beneficial Microbes Conference, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 2016Invited oral presentationLink
ScientistsK Morrison, A Holloway, J Stearns, M Surette, H McDonald, E Ratcliffe, J Schertzer, L Thabane, J Simioni, E Gunn, E Hutton “The Baby & Microbiota of the Intestine Cohort Studies: Baby & Mi and Baby & PreMi,” 6th Annual In-FLAME Workshop, New York, USA, 2017Oral presentationDownload
ScientistsN van Best, P. Savelkoul, L. Bervoets, M. Hornef, M. Mommers, J Penders. “Impact of breastmilk and solid food on human gut microbial colonization: the LucKi birth cohort”. 6th Annual In-FLAME Workshop, New York, USA, 2017Oral presentationLink
ScientistsN van Best, P Savelkoul, . Schaap, S Olde-Damink, J Penders, M Hornef. “Postnatal development of the murine gut microbiota.” 6th Annual In-FLAME Workshop, New York, USA, 2017Oral presentationLink
ScientistsE Hutton, K Morrison, A Holloway, J Stearns, M Surette, H McDonald, E Ratcliffe, J Schertzer, L Thabane, M Mommers, L Bervoets, N van Best, S Lau, E Hamelmann, J Penders “From Infancy to Childhood: The Intersection of Gastrointestinal Microbial Communities, Diet and Health,” 6th Annual In-FLAME Workshop, New York, USA, 2017Oral presentationDownload
AcademiaJ Penders, L Bervoets, Bervoets L, Massa G, Guedens W, Louis E, Noben JP, Adriaensens P. “Metabolic profiling of the type 1 diabetes mellitis in children by proton NMR-based metabolomics.” 6th Annual In-FLAME Workshop, New York, USA, 2017Oral presentationLink
ScientistsJ Penders. “From Infancy to Childhood: GastroIntestinal Microbial Communities, Diet, and Health.” JPI Symposium, 2017.Oral presentationDownload
AcademiaE Yousuf, E Gunn, V Vaughan Williams, M Carvalho, J Simioni, J Twiss, L Giglia, A Holloway, H McDonald, E Ratcliffe, J Schertzer, M Surette, J Stearns, L Thabane, C Stuart, G Travis, E Hutton, and K Morrison. “Establishing the Relationship Between Gut Microbiota and Early-Life Lean Mass in Preterm Infants.” Presented at: - EMPhasis on Health Research Symposium, Hamilton, Canada, 2017 - McMaster Child Health Research Day, Hamilton, Canada, 2017Poster presentationDownload
AcademiaE Yousuf, M Carvalho, S Dizzell, E Gunn, J Simioni, J Twiss, E Hutton, K Morrison, J Stearns. “Exploring the viability of early gut microbiota analysis in preterm infants” Presented at: Pediatric Academic Society Conference, Toronto, Canada, 2018.Poster presentationDownload
AcademiaB Singh, S Dizzell, L ElDakiky, E Hutton, K Morrison, J Stearns. “Analytical methods for relatively low diversity microbial communities such as the infant gut microbiome - the case of the missing bfidobacteria.” Presented at: - Michael DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research (IIDR) Trainee Day, Hamilton, Canada, 2019 - 2019 McMaster FHS Plenary, Hamilton, Canada, 2019Poster presentationDownload
AcademiaC Homann, S Dizzell, J Li, E Gunn, R de Souza, E Hutton, J Stearns, K Morrison. “Dietary Intake and the Gut Microbiome in Full-Term Infants at Introduction of Solid Foods: A Longitudinal Study.” Presented at: - Child Health Research Day, Hamilton, Canada, 2019 - MODR Research Blitz, Hamilton, Canada, 2019 - Canadian National Perinatal Research Meeting, Banff, Canada, 2020 - Medical Sciences Research Day, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, 2020Poster presentationDownload
AcademiaE Yousuf, M Carvalho, S Dizzell, E Gunn, J Simioni, J Twiss, E Hutton, K Morrison, J Stearns. “Exploring the early development of the preterm gut microbiome”. Canadian National Perinatal Research Meeting, Montebello, Canada, 2019.Poster presentationDownload
ScientistsJ Penders. “From Infancy to Childhood: GastroIntestinal Microbial Communities, Diet, and Health.” JPI Symposium, 2019.Oral presentationLink
ScientistsG Galazzo, J Penders. “An altered gut microbiota establishment in early life is linked with the development of atopic dermatitis.” Dutch Society for Medical Microbiology Annual Spring Meeting, 2019.Oral presentationLink
ScientistsG Galazzo, J Penders. “An altered gut microbiota establishment in early life is linked with the development of atopic dermatitis.” World of Microbiome: Pregnancy, Birth & Infancy Conference, Milan, Italy, 2019.Poster presentationLink
AcademiaE Yousuf, M Carvalho, S Dizzell, E Gunn, J Simioni, J Twiss, E Hutton, K Morrison, J Stearns. “Persistence of bacteria in the preterm infant gut week after probiotic supplementation in the NICU.” Canadian National Perinatal Research Meeting, Banff, Canada, 2020.Poster presentationDownload
Scientists and CliniciansJ Penders. “Update on gut microbiota and allergic diseases.” Allergie im Fokus-Veranstaltung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Allergologie und klinische Immunologie (DGAKI), 2020.Invited oral presentationLink
clinicians and researchers within all aspects of allergologyJ. Penders. “Establishment of the infant microbiome” Nordic Allergy Symposium, 2018. Audience: clinicians and researchers within all aspects of allergologyInvited oral presentationLink

4.3 List of submitted patents and other outputs

Patent licencePartners involvedYearInternational eu or national patentCommentPdf

BACK

We use cookies to improve our website and your experience when using it. By continuing to navigate this site, you agree to the cookie policy. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

  I accept cookies from this site.
EU Cookie Directive Module Information